Understanding the Difference Between Secured and Unsecured Loans

Secured and Unsecured LoansDeciding to take out a loan is not a decision that should be made lightly. There are so many factors to take into consideration and if you have poor credit, then the decision is even bigger than if you had a stellar credit report.

In all honesty, not everyone has the perfect credit report and many people go through some financial hardship at some point, a hardship that remains on their report for years restricting what they can and cannot do and whether or not they can apply for a loan and be successful in their application.

There are two main types of personal loans that you need to be aware of, both of which are possible with a bad credit report. The first is secured and the second is unsecured. Both offer advantages and disadvantages.

Secured loans are often preferred by lenders because they reduce the risk to the lender. These personal loans are usually offered for larger amounts, maybe you want to do some renovations to your home or build an extension on your existing property. They require security, this usually means putting your home up as collateral.

The advantages of a secured loan are that because your home is used as security, your interest rates tend to be lower. You pay the loan back in monthly repayments, which can be fixed or not. Be aware if you choose this loan and don’t fix the repayment amount, the repayments could increase or there could be a lump sum payable at the end of the loan agreement.

The disadvantage to secured loans, whether you have a poor credit history or not, is that should you be unable to repay the loan for any reason, there is the possibility of losing your home, which will be sold to repay the amount you owe. This is not a situation anyone wants to find themselves in.

Bad credit unsecured loans are the leading choice which eliminates the risk of losing your home and reduces the risk to you, while increasing the risk to the lender. With unsecured loans you get offered a loan at an agreed repayment amount, you make regular monthly payments until the loan is paid back.

Bad credit unsecured loans don’t require any security and are offered on smaller amounts, usually up to around $10,000. While these loans offer a higher interest rate, they do reduce the risk to you and the risk of losing your home should you miss a payment or two.

As with any loan, whether you choose secured or unsecured, you need to take some steps before applying. Often you choose a personal loan because you need urgent cash that you don’t have available in the bank. Banking institutions these days make it exceptionally difficult to secure any loan, they expect you to have cash in the bank and a stellar credit report. There are lenders online that will help you get the funding you need even with a bad credit history.

Before deciding between the two types of loans available, it’s a good idea to get your hands on your credit report and see if there is any way of improving it before you apply. If not, then consider how the repayments of a bad credit unsecured personal loan will affect your monthly budget and ensure that you can repay the amounts each month without going into default.

Going into default will only leave you with even more money you have to pay and more bad news on your credit report, which is the last thing you want.

How to Quickly Set Up an Advertising Review Checklist for an Adjustable Rate Mortgage Loan

Rate Mortgage LoanEvery lender who is creating mortgage ads should have checklists available to use to confirm compliance with applicable rules and requirements. So what about a checklist for an adjustable rate mortgage advertisement? What should be in that check list? Here’s some ideas about what should be covered in your ARM mortgage advertisement checklist.

First, note that the majority of these rules come from Regulation Z and are discussed in the section of the law that covers the advertisement of mortgage loans. The ARMS we are discussing here are covered in the closed end credit section of the advertising rules in Regulation Z.

Your checklist should include information about the start rate for the advertisement. For example, you should say the start rate is 3.75%. You should also immediately show the APR adjacent to the interest rate in same font color and same font size. So APR on this example will show at 3.99%. Next you should say how long the initial rate will stay in effect.? If it’s a five year ARM, the answer is five years.

Next, you should state what the loan amount is and your checklist should identify the interest rate. So your checklist would show a Loan Amount of $200,000 and a lien position of “first”. After the lien amount, you should consider showing the amount of the finance charges in dollars. Lets say its $2300. This is not required but is good to consider. Another thing to consider is to mention the number of discount points if any so the consumer knows a bit more of the costs to receive this advertised rate.

The other required disclosure is to describe the index. In this case, we are advertising a LIBOR Arm loan. What’s left after that, use a rate available as of date (let’s say May 1, 2016) and refer to the margin on the loan (3.25%). Also, don’t forget to mention the term of the loan which in this case is 30 years.

So what else is needed? Regulation Z says you need to give the consumer more information about what the payment will be at the end of the initial fixed rate period. You can do this by describing the rate will be calculated using the margin plus the index subject to certain caps. There is a cap that limits the amount of the rate change at the first change, and a cap that limits subsequent rate changes. There is also a “life cap” that limits the maximum rate increase over the term of the loan.

When Do Portfolio Loans Become A Viable Option

Portfolio LoansNot all home purchases fall into a definitive category. While it would be simple for everyone to fit neatly into either the FHA, Conventional, VA, USDA, or Jumbo mortgage columns, each situation is unique. To handle those who may be financially stable enough for a mortgage, but not really line up with any one situation, portfolio loans may be the answer.

In a nutshell, portfolio lending occurs when the borrower is ineligible for traditional financing. Small banks and credit unions back these borrowers by keeping the mortgages in their portfolio in order to help the local economy grow. They are seen as the bank that is willing to take a chance on a local customer when the big conglomerates have turned them away.

Instead of looking at just the borrower’s credit history and income level, these establishments are willing to look at the big picture. They are willing to talk to the customer and find out what happened in the past to make potential amendments to their history if need be. For a lender considering a portfolio mortgage, the story is just as important. There are many reasons why these loans are the necessary way to go.

Recent Credit Problems

There are times when a borrower has gone through a rough patch and is now on the other side. However, that patch has resulted in damaged credit. It could be because of a divorce or injury that made them unable to work for a few months. In other situations, a recent bankruptcy, foreclosure, or short sale could be responsible. For portfolio loans, the waiting period to obtain a mortgage with these types of credit problems is less than what a traditional lender would require as long as the borrower can prove that he or she is back on their feet financially.

Foreign Nationals

Foreign nationals can run into problems trying to obtain a mortgage in the US. Often this boils down to two major issues: their income and credit are both established in a foreign country. Traditional mortgage options are not available. Portfolio mortgages is a viable option, provided the national can provide income history for at least the two previous years, a statement of assets, letter explaining their intent to stay within the US, proof that they are currently employed in the US, and copy of their VISA and all related documentation.

Unique Properties

Some properties are so unique that they defy the lender regulations for applicable properties. This situation is actually very common, especially when dealing with condominiums. Condominiums with a homeowner’s association are scrutinized to determine if the property is financially stable. If the association has a lack of reserves, then the mortgage may be denied. Also, if there is inadequate insurance coverage, an excessive number of units occupied by renters, or it is still under construction, then the lender may say no.

While condos are commonly denied by traditional lenders, they are far from the only type of unique property to be turned down. Commercially zoned properties that the borrower intends to use as a residence falls into this category. Log cabins, berm homes, and any home where an appraiser is having difficulty assessing the value may not qualify for a traditional mortgage.

Portfolio loans give hope to those who want to purchase a property but do not qualify for a traditional mortgage. Instead of looking at one aspect, these lenders want to understand the big picture.

How a Guarantor Home Loan Can Help You Enter the Property Market

Home LoanStruggling to save enough to buy a property? You may want to ask your family if they can provide a helping hand in the form of a family guarantee loan. This is when the equity in a family member’s home is used as security on your loan.

Also known as a family pledge or guarantor home loan, it is a type of mortgage that allows you to borrow more money and provide less of a deposit. Usually when a loan is more than 80% of the purchase price (80% LVR) you will have to pay lenders mortgage insurance, but a family guarantee means you won’t have this extra expense.

It’s even possible to avoid paying any deposit because the equity in your family’s home can act as a deposit. This ‘guarantee’ makes it possible for you to borrow the full 100% cost of the home, plus stamp duty and legal fees. Lenders mortgage insurance will still be payable if you borrow over 80% of a property’s value.

There are many issues to consider when taking out family guarantees and it pays to keep in mind that loan terms and conditions can vary between lenders. Not all lenders even offer these type of loans, so give us a call and we can advise you which lenders would best suit your situation.

Here are some of the common questions we get asked about guarantor home loans. For more detailed information about any of the following, don’t hesitate to get in contact.

Does the entire loan have to be guaranteed?
No, the loan can be split, enabling the equity in your family’s property to be used as security for a small portion of the loan, for example 20%. The lender will take a mortgage out over the guarantor’s property to this specified amount.

Who can act as guarantors?
Guarantors are usually parents, but some lenders under certain conditions will accept grandparents, siblings, a de facto partner or a former spouse. To be approved by a lender they must provide enough equity to cover the amount being guaranteed and in most cases do not need to show proof of income. Normal lending criteria will apply in all circumstances.

What are the risks of a guarantor home loan?
There are risks involved, which is why it is important for the guarantor to know what they are getting into. Some lenders even require legal advice is sought to ensure the guarantor understands that if there is a default on repayments, they will be the ones held liable.

How long does the guarantee have to be in place?
If the guarantor home loan is structured correctly, the guarantee doesn’t need to be in place for the entire duration of the loan. Once you have repaid the portion of the loan that is guaranteed or your property has increased in value, the guarantor can be released.